My Book Has A Face!

Up until this week, my novel was a manuscript bound by little more than hope and a dream.¬† But now, The Story Collector has been enveloped by a design that I have to say, I love!¬† So without further ado, here it is…

The_Story_Collector_7.indd

I am not exaggerating when I say my publisher (Urbane Publications) was AMAZING during this process.  Sooo open trying new ideas and making sure everyone was happy with the design.  This was beyond what I had expected and I just knew when I saw this cover, it was the one.  It was love at first sight!

But more importantly, it is the perfect introduction to the story.¬† It has a dreamlike quality that sets the tone for what is to follow.¬† In fact, that has been the overwhelming feedback I’ve received so far – that it draws you in, which is exactly what a cover should do.¬† So, what am I drawing you in TO?¬† Well you may ask!¬† Set in Ireland and wrapped in folklore, this book is very dear to my heart… but don’t take my word for it, read the blurb.

A beautiful and mysterious historical romance from the author of The Heirloom and The Mysterious Bakery on Rue de Paris.

Thornwood Village, 1910. Anna, a young farm girl, volunteers to help an intriguing American visitor, Harold Griffin-Krauss, translate ‘fairy stories’ from Irish to English.

But all is not as it seems and Anna soon finds herself at the heart of a mystery that threatens the future of her community and her very way of life…..

Captivated by the land of myth, folklore and superstition, Sarah Harper finds herself walking in the footsteps of Harold and Anna one hundred years later, unearthing dark secrets that both enchant and unnerve.

The Story Collector treads the intriguing line between the everyday and the otherworldly, the seen and the unseen. With a taste for the magical in everyday life, Evie Gaughan’s latest novel is full of ordinary characters with extraordinary tales to tell. Perfect for fans of Jess Kidd and Eowyn Ivey.

So there you have it folks, after months (nigh, years!) of banging on about this book, I can finally say that publication is imminent!  14th June to be precise, but for the impatient ones of the bunch, here is a link to pre-order a paperback version right this very minute on Amazon.

I have been so lucky to meet some fantastic and supportive writers and readers since my last publication and I just want to say thanks for all the shares and for helping me to spread the word.¬† I hope I’ve played my part in this process too, writing reviews, sharing links or just being a cheerleader when someone’s having a wobble.¬† It takes a village to make a book, so I guess that makes you the village people ūüėÄ

The Wacky World Of Genres

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Following on from my piece about Book Snobs, I’ve decided to wade into the murky pool that is ‘Genre’. ¬†Genre is what keeps us innocent readers from picking up the wrong kind of book by accident (God forbid), but do we really trust the ‘genre police’ to get it right?

 

Some genres are easily determined, like taking a novel’s length for example or if the content is fiction or non-fiction. ¬†However, some categories and sub-categories are more loosely defined and end up creating a very vague grouping of books with tenuous links. ¬†If you are a female author writing about a contemporary female character, chances are you will be shoved into the ‘Women’s Fiction’ genre. ¬†It has¬†taken quite a few years to appreciate how the term Chick Lit really devalues what is a popular and entertaining genre. ¬†These books are contemporary fiction and should have been labelled as such. ¬†Why was there a need to create a separate category for ‘Chicks’? ¬†Ah, well that’s all down to the marketing department. ¬†It’s a label that says ‘don’t take this author too seriously’, which trivialises the authors and the subject matter, giving the entire genre a bad reputation. ¬†Nowadays, calling a book ‘Chick Lit’ is like the ultimate put-down, which is such a pity because so many talented female authors have found themselves quarantined in that sub-category, never to escape. ¬†I can see the same thing happening now with Grip Lit – it seems to be losing its originality as the publishing houses churn out more and more imitations. ¬†The marketing is simple: they want the same thing, but different.

So Women’s Fiction is the new pigeon hole for female authors. ¬†But did you ever stop to wonder why we have Women’s Fiction but not Men’s Fiction? ¬†Booksellers might say it’s simply a marketing tool, a way to help readers find what they want, but why make women a sub-category? ¬†Women’s fiction includes books that have absolutely no relation to each other and span a dizzying array of styles and subject matter. ¬†The only common denominator is that they are written by women. ¬†In an article by Alison Flood in The Guardian, she questions the relevance of the genre:

I’m bewildered by how titles make it into these categories. The mix of books is so broad as to be meaningless, united only by the authors’ gender. But the fact remains the categories are there, and there are no equivalent “Men’s writers and fiction”, “Men’s literary fiction”, and “Men’s popular fiction” sections. They are just “fiction”, I guess.

Regular readers will know that I love a good scientific study to back up my claims, and this week is no different. ¬†So I went to the great trouble of looking up some of my favourite contemporary reads on Amazon to see what genre ‘the genre police’ have put them in.

David Nicholls – One Day ¬†‘Twenty years, two people, ONE DAY.’

Genre – Fiction

(A contemporary romance, by any other name…)


Graeme Simsion – The Rosie Effect ¬†‘Love isn’t an exact science – but no one told Don Tillman’

Genre – Fiction > Humour

(eh… a contemporary romance?!)


Jojo Moyes – Me Before You ¬†‘Neither of them knows they’re going to change the other for all time’¬†

Genre – Women’s Fiction > Romance

(Contemporary romance. ¬†Hang on, why’s this listed under a different genre?)


Marian Keyes – Rachel’s Holiday¬†‘They said I was a drug addict.¬†But my occasional drug use was strictly recreational.¬†And, hey, surely drug addicts are skinny?’

Genre – Women’s Fiction > Humour

(So here’s a darkly funny look at addiction. ¬†What genre should that be in? ¬†Is it written by a woman? ¬†Just stick it in women’s fiction)


Wikipedia describes Women’s Fiction¬†as:

an umbrella term for women centered books that focus on women’s life experience that are marketed to female readers

Which begs the question: Why don’t we have an umbrella term for men-centered books that focus on men’s life experience that are marketed to men? ¬†Oh no, hang on. ¬†We do. ¬†It’s called fiction. ¬†Shouldn’t we be moving beyond this? ¬†An author is an author, regardless of their gender, and a book is a book. ¬†Why do readers need warning signs that the book might be about women’s issues or written by a woman? ¬†Is all this marketing and categorising just limiting people in their reading lists? ¬†Understandably, some readers might prefer a book with a male or a female protagonist, but is that not what a blurb is for? ¬†To inform the reader of what lies between the pages?

So who created the category of women’s fiction anyway and how did that conversation go?

*A boardroom clad in mahogany, somewhere posh*

Head of marketing: “Hate to be the bearer of bad news old chaps, but it would appear that the women are trying their hand at writing books.”

*One board member faints.  Another hurls himself out of a window.*

Second¬†in command: “Say it isn’t so!”

Head: “I’m afraid it is so. ¬†Now brace yourselves; it looks like we might have to publish them.”

*Two more exit via the window.*

Head: “Pull yourselves together men!”

Second: “But how will we know which books to read? ¬†I mean, isn’t there a danger that we might mistakenly buy a book written by a woman?”

Head: “Ah, yes, now I’ve considered this frightening consequence and come up with an idea. ¬†We will label their books ‘Women’s Fiction’, so there will be absolutely no confusion.”

Second: “Splendid idea! ¬†Proper fiction will still be written by men and we can funnel the ‘ladies’ into their specialised sub-category. ¬†For women. ¬†Who read about other women. ¬†Who write about women’s things. ¬†Which have no bearing on our world. ¬†The end.”

*All characters are fictional, any resemblance to the real people behind the women’s fiction label is purely coincidental *

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